Logic & Letters: Reason as Literary Method, from Classicists to Early Modernists (Panel)


British / Interdisciplinary Humanities

Miriam Diller (Rutgers University)

This panel discusses some of the theoretical apparati that are either behind, or can be translated into reading and writing, from Aristotelian to Baconian and more. It is intended to focus on the early generations of writing from the classical through the early modern periods, exploring intersections between philosophy, the sciences, and literature (among other fields) as these fields undergo codification, as well as massive philosophical and cultural upheaval.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to: theory and development of forms of writing (such as the division between literary and scientific writing, and the rise of the scientific monograph); logical systems in writing and reading; the reader as detective/scientist/writer; philosophies of reading and writing; poetics, images, and concepts. Submissions covering any era and works from the classical through the early modern period are welcome, as well as submissions that discuss works of these eras in a more modern context. Please submit a 1-page PDF (including your affiliation/status) to NeMLA website.
This panel focuses on the classical through the early modern periods, and seeks to discuss some of the theoretical apparati that are either behind, or can be translated, into reading and writing. Particular priority is given to reason and specific logical systems, from Aristotelian to Baconian (and more!). Suggested topics include, but are not limited to: reader or writer as scientist; philosophies/frameworks of reading; and logical systems as literary methodologies.