You and Me and Ut Pictura Poesis Make Three: Illustrated Poetry after 1900 (Panel)


British / American

Jennie-Rebecca Falcetta (Massachusetts College of Art and Design)

Illustrated poetry by a single creator, like Blake’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience, reads with a certain unity of purpose (even if it may contain competing word-image discourses). When poet and visual artist collaborate, however, a different dynamic unfolds. This panel invites examination of illustrated poetry, published after 1900, containing text by one person and images by another. Papers may treat broadsides, poetry chapbooks, children’s picture books, anthologies, and other illustrated poetic productions. Subjects for investigation can include contemporaneous collaborations, such as the one between Larry Rivers and Frank O’Hara for Stones (1957-59); new illustrations of extant poems, in the vein of Allen Crawford’s 2014 Whitman Illuminated: Song of Myself; or a retroactive application of older art to newer poetry.

The focus of this panel will be the collisions and collusions that occur between a work of poetry and the accompanying images made by someone other than the writer. How do the pictorial elements interpret, illustrate, undermine, subvert, amplify, or otherwise engage the text? Topics for investigation might include the reader’s response to the text-image relationship; the role of illustration in making meaning of and with the text; and/or a discussion of useful vocabulary and theoretical frameworks for engaging and exploring the dynamics of collaborative illustrated poetry, to name just a few.

Please submit abstracts of 300 words to NeMLA website by 30 September 2015. Inquiries welcome; send them to Jennie-Rebecca Falcetta at jfalcetta@massart.edu.



This panel invites examination of illustrated poetry, published after 1900, containing text by one person and images by another. Papers may treat broadsides, poetry chapbooks, children’s picture books, anthologies, and other illustrated poetic productions. Subjects for investigation can include contemporaneous collaborations; new illustrations of extant poems; or a retroactive application of older art to newer poetry. The focus of the session will be the collisions and collusions that occur between poem and illustration, including how the pictorial elements interpret, critique, subvert, amplify, or otherwise engage the text.