Legacy and the Androgynous Mind: Reading Woolf and the Romantics (Seminar)


British

Melissa Rampelli (St. John’s University)

Meghan Nolan (SUNY Rockland Community College)

“One must turn back to Shakespeare then, for Shakespeare was androgynous; and so were Keats and Sterne and Cowper and Lamb and Coleridge[…] Some collaboration has to take place in the mind between the woman and the man before the art of creation can be accomplished. Some marriage of opposites has to be consummated” (Woolf, A Room of One’s Own).

In what ways were Virginia Woolf’s ideas and forms building upon or working against Romantic literary and cultural sensibilities? Woolf consistently returned to England’s intellectual, cultural, and literary past as she grappled with legacies of nationalism, gender, and sexuality and their implications for consciousness and the subject. Woolf’s A Room of One’s Own shows us that she read the Romantic poets extensively, claiming Coleridge, Keats, Cowper, and Lamb as exemplary poets of the androgynous mind she championed. With this seminar we seek to foster a rich dialogue around the relationship between Woolf’s oeuvre (fiction and non-fiction) and Romanticism in its lyricism and ideas. Papers may touch on NeMLA’s 2017 theme of urban ecology/the city; nature; memory; fragmentation, or other topics.

In what ways were Virginia Woolf’s ideas and forms building upon or working against Romantic literary and cultural sensibilities? Woolf consistently returned to England’s intellectual, cultural, and literary past as she grappled with legacies of nationalism, gender, and sexuality and their implications for consciousness and the subject. With this seminar we seek to foster a rich dialogue around the relationship between Woolf’s oeuvre (fiction and non-fiction) and Romanticism. Papers may touch on NeMLA’s 2017 theme of urban ecology/the city; nature; memory; fragmentation, or other topics.