Disability in Anglophone Literature (Panel)


Anglophone / British

Suha Kudsieh (College of Staten Island-CUNY)

This panel examines the significance and the depiction of disability in Anglophone literature (i.e. works written by authors from South African, Africa, Canada, Australia and New Zealand). Examples of such works include: Salman Rushdie's The Moor's Last Sigh, J. M. Coetzee's Foe and Waiting for the Barbarians, Bapsi Sidhwa's Cracking India, Darren Groth's Are You Seeing Me?, Rachna Gilmore's A Screaming Kind of Day, Anita Desai's Clear Light of Day, Cyril Axelrod's And the Journey Begins, Chenjerai Hove's Ancestors, Ngugi wa Thiong’o's A Grain of Wheat, Ben Okri's The Famished Road and Songs of Enchantment, Florence Serwaa Oteng's Give Them A Name, and Keri Hulme's The Bone People.

Some of the themes that can be examined are: the implications of depicting disabled bodies or impaired characters in Anglophone literature; the difference between depicting disabled children, as in young adult novels, and disabled adult characters; the difference gender makes; and the role genre plays (autobiographies versus feiction). Papers that analyze immobility and amputations; blindness, deafness, and muteness; autism and cognitive disability; and exceptional, deformed, or monstrous bodies, among many others, in Anglophone and Commonwealth literature are welcome. Priority will be given to proposals that examine recently published works. Please submit a 300-350 word proposal.



This panel examines the significance and the depiction of disability in Anglophone literature. Some of the themes that can be examined are: the implications of depicting disabled bodies or impaired characters in Anglophone literature; the difference between depicting disabled children, as in young adult novels, and disabled adult characters; the difference gender makes; and the role genre plays (autobiographies versus feiction). Papers that analyze immobility and amputations; blindness, deafness, and muteness; autism and cognitive disability; and exceptional, deformed, or monstrous bodies, among many others, in Anglophone and Commonwealth literature are welcome. Priority will be given to proposals that examine recently published works. Please submit a 300-350 word proposal.