Francophone African Women Writers Embracing Eco-feminism (WIF session)

(Panel)


French and Francophone / Women's and Gender Studies

Anna Rocca (Salem State University)

Eco-feminism is largely concerned with systems of domination in human societies rooted in the destructive growth-oriented logics of patriarchy. Eco-feminism uses gender analysis to expose the connectedness of these systems and their exploitation of both humans and nature. By pursuing the end of all forms of oppression, including the oppression of the environment, eco-feminism, Philomena Ojomo states, “highlights the interconnections between the domination of humans by fellow humans on the basis of race, gender and class on the one hand, and human domination of the earth on the other” (54).[1]

This panel welcomes papers exploring francophone African women writers’ narratives that approach human life as deeply embedded in both nature and culture. Some themes of consideration should include, among others: how literary accounts expose the intersectional ties among environmentalism, anticolonial struggle, and social justice; in what ways African female writers challenge unjust, ecologically destructive forms of imperial development and engage in alternative forms of ecofeminist environmental ethics; how they represent the double oppression of women and nature; and finally, how do women writers depict communitarian and relational living, and interdependence between humans and nature.

[1] Philomena A. Ojomo. “An African Understanding of Environmental Ethics.” Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya (PAK) New Series, Vol 2 No 2, December 2010, pp 49-63.

This panel welcomes papers exploring francophone African women writers’ narratives that approach human life as deeply embedded in both nature and culture. How have literary accounts exposed the intersectional ties among environmentalism, anticolonial struggle, and social justice? In which ways have African female writers challenged unjust ecologically destructive forms of imperial development and engaged in alternative forms of ecofeminist environmental ethics? How have they represented the double oppressions of women and nature? How do women writers depict communitarian and relational living and interdependence between humans and nature?