Digital Humanities in Language and Literature Classrooms (Panel)


Pedagogy & Professional / Interdisciplinary Humanities

Agnes Peysson Zeiss (Bryn Mawr College)

Kelsey Dufresne (North Carolina State University)

During our rapidly changing times when remote/online teaching is increasingly needed and increasingly part of our educational and campus reality, this panel is looking for proposals directly connected to the teaching of digital humanities using available and innovative technologies. We are interested in discussing what might the literature and language classroom and instruction look like following this new demand and orientation around digital media? How can we help or begin to implement the fostering of digital humanities in our classrooms to make literature, as well as its characters, stories, and authors, more accessible for our students? As digital literacy skills are becoming increasingly coveted and necessary for not only our students, but also for the betterment of our 21st-century pedagogical practices as teachers, this panel, "Digital Humanities in Language and Literature Classrooms," will provide attendees with purposeful and direct resources to integrate into their own classrooms, while providing presenters with the opportunity to showcase and share their own experience-based practices and examples of digital humanities implementation in their language and literature classes.

Examples might include projects presented through virtual reality systems to explore author positionality and reader experience, Camtasia and VoiceThread, and exploring identity issues with StorymapJS and Global Simulation techniques.

Ultimately, we want this session and shared resources/projects to consider: What is there to gain when we introduce digital humanities into the language and literature classroom?
In the 21st-century collegiate language and literature classroom, how might instructors and students alike utilize digital humanities to increase accessibility of content, dissemination of information, and/or engagement between students and the content? How can we better incorporate digital humanities skills into our teaching as well as our learning? Presenters will share their most recent methodological research, latest didactic materials/resources created, and first-hand inspirational classroom experiences. Participants will also be encouraged to share their experience and the tools/assignments they found successful, or even those that did not work as well as they had hoped and expected.