After the Plague Year: Caring for/with Shakespeare in Text and in Performance  (Seminar)


British / Pedagogy & Professional

Barbara Bono (SUNY University at Buffalo)

Maria Horne (SUNY University at Buffalo)

The seminar we propose is a follow-up to our 2021 NeMLA Pandemic Shakespeare: Shakespeare in the Time of Coronavirus, which drew 14 outstanding interdisciplinary participants from across the United States, the United Kingdom, and Asia. We envision our next seminar as an opportunity to further reflect on the changes in pedagogy and performance praxis that have germinated from the changes brought about by the global health crisis and social justice movements. As Shakespeareans working across the disciplinary lines of literary and theatre pedagogy and performance, we invite colleagues to present papers critically discussing the experience of reading, teaching, performing, and appreciating Shakespeare in text and in performance.

We ask: How will a more caring approach to Shakespeare help design a more engaging experience for all? The pandemic and the reckoning with systemic racism have emphasized the need to rethink how we read, perform, and teach the Shakespearean canon while creating more inclusive learning and performance environments. Scholars and practitioners have quickly developed new ways to teach and perform outside the confines of the traditional classroom and the stage. As we adjust to new teaching modes (virtual, hybrid, blended, in person) as well as virtual and socially distanced performances, and as we build on that momentum, we invite a conversation on lessons learned and how to evolve old practices for the world we live in now. What are the many facets of teaching and performing Shakespeare for the future? How do we best foster inclusive pedagogy and performance space? How are artists, scholars, and practitioners rethinking Shakespeare and nurturing a culture of innovation?

How will a more caring approach to Shakespeare help design a more engaging experience for all? The pandemic and the reckoning with systemic racism have emphasized the need to rethink how we read, perform, and teach the Shakespearean canon while creating more inclusive learning and performance environments. How do we best foster inclusive pedagogy and performance space?